Click and Drag

Yesterday, XKCD published something incredible. First, when it appeared in my RSS Reader, it looked strange and unfinished:

but when viewed on XKCD’s page it proved to be the most spectacular experience I had for some time. It was so astounding I wanted to see it wholesome. So, here it is: a combined view of all the source images of the huge world of XKCD.

World of XKCD
World of XKCD

You’ll start in the top-left corner, which is blank, but if’ll you scroll down to the ground level, or right to the whales, or zoom out, you should get to the image itself.

Moving on

It’s almost six years now since I joined Opera.

I’ve learned a lot here and some of the things I learned had even something to do with the work. I’ve met a lot of strange, incredible people and I drank strange, incredible things (two drinks I first drank while at Opera are akevitt and Mad Cat – a variation on Mad Dog [a Polish shot] served only in the 7 Cats Pub in Wrocław, if you are visiting, this drink is a must).

Now the time came for me to move on. To navigate new waters, to try something new. As my employment at Opera finished last Friday, I went down the memory lane – back to the Wrocław Business Park, to a company that is partially descendant of my former employer. I have a vague idea, what my role will be exactly (I had introduction day yesterday and I will meet my coworkers today), but what I now know, it has something to do with RNC and that it will not be MacOS…

Oh, and there was Opera 12.02 released last week

Opera 12

A new Opera has been released just now. In this one, I’ve played with the camera support on Windows, so – if you have a webcam, head on to Facekat, give it a spin and tell me, how it was.  Among other things I’ve touched: RTL on Windows (those pesky close buttons!), extensions API acessing tabs and windows (and tab groups, oh my!).

Shiny Demo: QRY, a camera-based QR-reader

 

Amazon Kindle – rectification

Yesterday I wrote that I don’t think kindle is for me. I didn’t like the navigation, I didn’t like the size. And those were the real issues I had. A week ago. Then I started to use it as a reader for a good book (Hunger Games Trilogy, if anyone is interested) and everything changed.

This device is good at emulating a book. Extremely good. Colors? That’s good for magazines, and this device sucks at emulating magazines, so – meh. Navigation? Occasionally I still stumble upon going forward, when I think I go backward, but that starts to be a song of the past.

Because the technology is sooo good, I start reading and I forget this is not a book, but an electronic device. The amount of the text that can fit on the screen is to small? With a good book, you don’t even notice the clicks to change pages. There is a glare from a lamp nearby? When you want to read on, you position yourself just-right and the glare goes away. And on Easter Monday there was enough sun to test it against direct sunlight. Oh-em-gee again. Where all of the backlit devices fail in such conditions, kindle just strives to supply even reacher contrast, than in-doors. Wow, just wow.

Don’t get me wrong, the problems I described yesterday are still problems. But I would be willing to work around them and I eagerly await any new technology on the field.

A Touch of Class

Last Thursday Bjarne Stroustrup was visiting Institute of CompSci here at Wrocław University with his „Touch of Class” lecture. Most of the questions in the Q&A section were either hostile or stupid (mostly stemming from Bjarne’s claim qsort is inferior to std::sort), but there was also first info about next spec I’ve ever heard of (he mentioned something about C++17 and the need for taking only a small change, if they are to be on time).

The  notoriety of the lecture resulted in what I believe was a total disregard for public safety. The sheer number of people in the auditorium was twice the hall’s capacity. There were not only students present, but programmers from companies from all around the city.  We came in about an hour prior the lecture, but there was almost no sitting places left at that point.  After that in only got worse. People were standing in the door frames, sitting on the stairs, someone got the benches from the corridor and put them almost at the blackboards.  I’ve seen people I last spoke with five years ago. It seemed it was a rock concert of sorts.

Finally, the meeting ended with the guest signing books and posters after which the host kidnapped him for a dinner, away from those pesky geeks.